General Laparoscopy Surgical Procedure Nebraska Patient Education
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General Laparoscopy Surgical Procedure Nebraska Patient Education

On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown. You may receive a sedative by mouth and an intravenous line may be put in. You will then be transferred to the operating table. Your doctor will scrub thoroughly and will apply an antiseptic solution to the skin around the area where the incision will be made... ... and place a sterile drape around the operative site. The anesthesiologist will begin to administer anesthesia - most probably general anesthesia. Patient Education and Medical Malpractice After allowing a few minutes for the anesthetic to take effect, a small incision is made above the umbilicus; then, a hollow needle will be inserted through the abdominal wall. And the abdomen will be inflated with carbon dioxide. An umbilical port is created for the laparoscope. One or more incisions will be made, with care taken to keep the openings as small as possible. During the procedure, the surgeon will use the laparoscope to find and identify the areas in your body of interest - as well as to guide any other instruments required for the completion of the procedure. Patient Education and Medical Malpractice Then the instruments are withdrawn . . the carbon dioxide is allowed to escape . . . the muscle layers and other tissues are sewn together . . . and the skin is closed with sutures or staples. Finally, one or more sterile dressings are applied. Patient Education Company Patient Education Company
TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate (penis) Surgery - PreOp® Patient Education
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TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate (penis) Surgery - PreOp® Patient Education

TURP Transurethral Resection Prostate Surgery - PreOp® Patient Education - StoreMD™ for Physician videos: http://store.preop.com Patient Education Company Your doctor has recommended that you undergo a Trans Urethral Resection of the Prostate - or TURP. But what exactly does that mean? he prostate gland is a walnut-sized organ that is part of your reproductive system. It provides some of the fluid contained in semen. The prostate is located just under the bladder and behind the testicles. The urethra -- a hollow tube that carries both urine and semen to the penis -- passes through the prostatTe. In some men, the prostate gland becomes enlarged. Symptoms of an enlarged prostate include: Patient Education * a full bladder feeling even when the bladder is empty * pain when urinating * weak urinary stream * infertility * and sexual dysfunction. To relieve you of your symptoms, your doctor feels that you would benefit from a surgical procedure called TURP. TURP is designed to relieve symptoms by reducing the size of the prostate. It is also a diagnostic procedure. Tissue removed during a resection of the prostate or TURP is routinely screened for the presence of cancer. So make sure that you ask your doctor to carefully explain the reasons behind this recommendation. Your Procedure: On the day of your operation, you will be asked to put on a surgical gown. You may receive a sedative by mouth and an intravenous line may be put in. Once on the table, your feet and legs will be placed in an elevated position with your knees apart. The nurse will swab the penis with an antiseptic solution. Your doctor will then lift your penis upward. A well-lubricated instrument called a resectoscope is then gently inserted into the urethra. When the resectoscope reaches the back of the penis, your doctor will pull the penis downward in order to create a straight path into the prostate. Using this tool, your doctor will then scrape excess tissue from the prostate, restoring it to its normal size. Tissue removed from the prostate may be sent a laboratory for analysis. When the surgery is complete, your doctor will remove the resectoscope. Your doctor will probably ask you to wear a temporary Foley catheter. A Foley catheter is a narrow tube inserted through your urethra and into your bladder. The catheter is connected to a bag that is attached to your leg by a strap. While the Foley catheter is in place, urine will pass from your bladder into the bag. You will not need to urinate into a toilet. The nurse will show you how to change the bag when it is full. An appointment will be made for you to return to the doctor's office in a couple of days to have the catheter removed. As soon as the anesthesia wears off and you feel comfortable, you'll be allowed to leave. Patient Education Company